Feb
22
Fri
Building Capacity to Manage Mental Health and the Opioid Crisis in the Foothills @ J. E. Broyhill Civic Center
Feb 22 @ 8:30 am – 4:30 pm

Description

Full Day and Afternoon-only Sessions Available!

Morning Session- Getting Primary Care into the Battle
The US is facing a crisis in both mental health and opioid abuse. Mental health care embedded within primary care, medical homes can go a long way to providing a solution to this crisis. Medication-assisted treatment (MAT) combined with behavioral therapy can restore productive lives. Our expert speakers will discuss the practical ways to make this work in busy primary care offices.

Topics will include:
• Common mental health issues seen in primary care including substance abuse and chronic pain
• Integrating with mental health specialists and making this work financially
• Providing effective medication-assisted treatment in primary care settings
• Perceived barriers to providing mental health care in primary care settings

Afternoon Session: Mobilizing the Community to Overcome Barriers and Find Solutions
The opioid crisis is truly an epidemic of epic proportions. Inadequate mental health capacity adds to the challenge. The impact is felt daily by individuals, families, and communities. Join us to look at our realities and find solutions.

This will be a dynamic and interactive session using a facilitated small group/tabletop discussion format. The session will focus on three key dimensions of the opioid crisis – mental health factors that contribute to the crisis, patient/chronic care management, and local, team-based solutions.

Results will include:
• Finding common and unique challenges of mental health and opioid use from all constituents represented
• Addressing modifiers or facilitators from a systems perspective that impact the issues
• Identifying next day changes that each participant can make in their own communities or organizations

Target Audience

Physicians, Advanced Practice Providers, Pharmacists, Nurses, Emergency Medicine, First Responders, Paramedics, Counselors, Social Workers, Psychologists, Teachers and Legislators

Objectives

Upon completion of this knowledge-based educational activity, participants will be able to:

  • Describe the embedded integrated care clinical model using a behaviorist embedded in a primary care team and roles and responsibilities of the team members
  • Examine the steps to operationalize the integrated care model, including planning, staffing, workflow, facilities, care coordination and information technology
  • Review the development of substance use problems and the neurobiology of addiction
  • Recognize how to appropriately evaluate and use opioids to treat chronic pain into busy primary care settings, including how to integrate Medication Assisted Treatment (MAT) (ex: buprenorphine) strategies
  • Engage in discussion and develop actions to breakdown barriers that society and healthcare providers have in treating addiction and substance misuse
  • Describe the efforts by NC DHHS to combat the opioid and mental health challenges in NC, including the NC Opioid Task Force and Medicaid transformation/tailored plans

Faculty

  • Ed J. Bujold, MD, FAAFP
  • Hazel Tapp, PhD
  • Stephen Wyatt, DO
  • Joel Hornberger, MHS
  • Kim Kimminau, PhD

Sessions

Full Day Attendance OR Afternoon Only

FULL DAY: Getting Primary Care into the Battle (Morning) & Mobilizing Community Resources (Afternoon)
2/22 8:30 AM–4:30 PM
ONLY AFTERNOON: Mobilizing Community Resources
2/22 12:30 PM–4:30 PM
Mar
4
Mon
Treating Pain Safer: One Hour Online Course for Safe Opioid Prescribing – AVAILABLE NOW through March 15, 2021! @ Webinar
Mar 4 @ 12:00 am – 12:00 am

Treating Pain Safer: One Hour Online Course for Safe Opioid Prescribing

Description:
Literature has shown that prescribers receive little education on the treatment of pain resulting in less effective pain treatment with worse outcomes. Participants will learn the evidence-based analysis of the relative effectiveness of medications and their side effects, recommendations on how to improve treatment of acute and chronic pain and recognizing substance use/opioid use disorders. Participants in this online educational activity must pass a posttest for successful completion. This course will focus on acute pain treatments/prescribing that can decrease the likelihood of long-term use.

As of July 1, 2017 all physicians (other than residents), physician assistants, nurse practitioners, podiatrists, and dentists who prescribe controlled substances must satisfy the controlled-substance prescribing CE requirement as set forth by their NC professional boards. Requirements vary by discipline and board. Prescribers will turn in controlled substance CE credits when they renew licensure.

Course Objectives:
1. Describe the impact of the opioid crisis
2. Identify the CDC guidelines for prescribing opioids for acute pain and the STOP Act
3. Discuss opioid alternatives and office policies for safe opioid prescribing

Mar
8
Fri
Behavioral Treatment of Chronic Pain: Evidence-Based Tools to Move from Hurt to Hope @ MAHEC
Mar 8 @ 9:00 am – 4:45 pm

Description

Across the nation, healthcare providers are taking another look at how to safely and effectively treat pain while also reducing the risks associated with opioids. It is estimated that 100 million people in the U.S. are living with chronic pain and that approximately 1/3 of these individuals are seeking medical treatment for their pain.

Pain management has typically not been a part of behavioral health practice but research and clinical practice are demonstrating that behavioral interventions are the most effective treatment for chronic pain. The CDC recently put out guidelines that highlight the opioid epidemic and its tragic consequences, along with recommendations for treating chronic pain. Behavioral treatment is the most effective treatment and should be tried prior to prescribing opioids.

More behavioral health providers with expertise in behavioral interventions for pain management are needed to combat the opioid epidemic. This interactive and cutting-edge training will provide participants with innovative and evidence-based tools and techniques to expand their clinical practice and treat chronic pain. Participants will gain the skills and confidence needed to provide practical and life-changing interventions to help individuals manage chronic pain and enjoy active, healthy and meaningful lives.

Can’t make this date? This program is also offered on March 8th, 2019- Click HERE for details and to register!

Download Event Brochure 

Target Audience

Behavioral health professionals including psychologists, social workers, counselors, marriage and family therapists, substance abuse counselors, and others interested in this topic.

Objectives

  • Define pain and its emotional aspects
  • Describe and map out the chronic pain cycle
  • List risks of opioid medications
  • Utilize effective components of the cognitive-behavioral treatment of chronic pain
  • Demonstrate mindful approaches for chronic pain
Apr
1
Mon
Treating Pain Safer: One Hour Online Course for Safe Opioid Prescribing – AVAILABLE NOW through March 15, 2021! @ Webinar
Apr 1 @ 12:00 am – 12:00 am

Treating Pain Safer: One Hour Online Course for Safe Opioid Prescribing

Description:
Literature has shown that prescribers receive little education on the treatment of pain resulting in less effective pain treatment with worse outcomes. Participants will learn the evidence-based analysis of the relative effectiveness of medications and their side effects, recommendations on how to improve treatment of acute and chronic pain and recognizing substance use/opioid use disorders. Participants in this online educational activity must pass a posttest for successful completion. This course will focus on acute pain treatments/prescribing that can decrease the likelihood of long-term use.

As of July 1, 2017 all physicians (other than residents), physician assistants, nurse practitioners, podiatrists, and dentists who prescribe controlled substances must satisfy the controlled-substance prescribing CE requirement as set forth by their NC professional boards. Requirements vary by discipline and board. Prescribers will turn in controlled substance CE credits when they renew licensure.

Course Objectives:
1. Describe the impact of the opioid crisis
2. Identify the CDC guidelines for prescribing opioids for acute pain and the STOP Act
3. Discuss opioid alternatives and office policies for safe opioid prescribing

Apr
4
Thu
Treating Pain Safely: Fewer Opioids and Better Results Controlled Substances Education for Prescribers @ MAHEC Mary C. Nesbitt Biltmore Campus, Pisgah Room
Apr 4 @ 5:30 pm – 8:45 pm

Literature has shown that prescribers receive little education on the treatment of pain, resulting in less effective pain treatment with worse outcomes. Attendees will learn the evidence-based analysis of the relative effectiveness of medications and their side effects, recommendations on how to improve treatment of acute and chronic pain, and recognizing substance use/opioid use disorders. This program will include the three required topics outlined by the new CME requirement in 21 NCAC 32R .0101:

• Controlled substances prescribing practices
• Recognizing signs of the abuse or misuse of controlled substances
• Controlled substance prescribing for chronic pain management

As of July 1, 2017 all physicians (other than residents), physician assistants, nurse practitioners, podiatrists, and dentists who prescribe controlled substances must satisfy the controlled-substance prescribing CE requirements as set forth by their licensing boards; requirements vary by discipline and board. Physicians must follow the CME requirement per 21 NCAC 32R .0101 and will turn in record of controlled substance CME when they renew licensure.

Objectives

  • Describe the impact of the opioid crisis
  • Identify the CDC guidelines for prescribing opioids for acute pain
  • Identify the CDC guidelines for prescribing opioids for chronic pain
  • Discuss what to do with patients on opioids that fall outside the guidelines
May
1
Wed
Providers’ Clinical Support System – Buprenorphine Office Based Treatment for Opioid Use Disorders The “Half and Half” Course – Eastern AHEC @ Eastern AHEC
May 1 @ 4:00 pm – 8:45 pm

Description

Opioid dependence is epidemic in the United States. While progress has been made in training providers, the gap in providing effective treatment of opioid use disorders continues to widen—moving beyond heroin addicted individuals to a much larger and diverse segment of the population. This increase is predominantly due to an alarming increase in addiction to prescription opioid analgesic medications. Buprenorphine, the most recent addition to the pharmacotherapies available to treat opioid dependence, is novel among the opioid pharmacotherapies because of its partial agonist properties. It has been placed on Schedule III and is available by prescription from a physician’s office-based practice.

Recognizing the impact of this addiction, as well as learning how to treat opioid use disorders, are important steps in combating this ever growing medical problem. To obtain the waiver to prescribe, providers are required to take specialized training. PCSS-MAT uses the Half-and-Half format (first, 4.25 hours of face-to-face training with an instructor, followed by 3.75 hours of on-your-own-training that must be completed along with a post test). This meets the training requirements for physicians; however, additional training is required for advanced practice providers. The training focuses on the specifics of treating patients with opioid use disorders in office-based settings and clinical vignettes to help trainees think through “real life” experiences in opioid use disorders treatment. Once the waiver training is completed in full, participants will receive a CME certificate of attendance from AAAP.

This program includes up to 2.0 hours of controlled substances content. Per NCAC rules: As of July 1, 2017, all physicians (other than residents), physician assistants, nurse practitioners, podiatrists, and dentists who prescribe controlled substances must satisfy the controlled-substance prescribing CE requirements as set forth by their licensing boards. Requirements vary by discipline and board.

Please note:
This event will be held at Eastern AHEC, 2600 W Arlington Blvd., Greenville, NC.

Recovery Within Reach: Building Team Expertise in Office-Based Opioid Treatment (OBOT) – Eastern AHEC @ Eastern AHEC
May 1 @ 4:00 pm – 8:45 pm

Description

Opioid addiction is a chronic, relapsing brain disease that affects millions of Americans and produces a tremendous burden on the healthcare system. In 2002, U.S. physicians gained the opportunity to treat opioid-addicted patients with buprenorphine in primary care settings, commonly referred to as office-based opioid treatment (OBOT). OBOT has been shown to be effective in primary care settings and impacts public health through the reduction of opioid use, opioid overdose mortality and transmission of infectious diseases. However, it remains underutilized.

One consistently cited barrier preventing OBOT expansion is lack of adequate clinical support given the additional needs for patient monitoring. Successful medication-assisted treatment (MAT) requires a team-based approach just like treatment for other chronic diseases. In addition, treatment is more effective when providers can use a trauma-informed and gender-responsive treatment plan.

The goal of this companion program to the AAAP Clinical Support System: Buprenorphine Office-Based Treatment for Opioid Use Disorders (The “Half and Half” Course) is to increase the comfort level and expertise of the healthcare team by outlining a team approach, trauma-informed interventions, gender-responsive care, and recommendations for implementation of buprenorphine OBOT.

May
6
Mon
Treating Pain Safer: One Hour Online Course for Safe Opioid Prescribing – AVAILABLE NOW through March 15, 2021! @ Webinar
May 6 @ 12:00 am – 12:00 am

Treating Pain Safer: One Hour Online Course for Safe Opioid Prescribing

Description:
Literature has shown that prescribers receive little education on the treatment of pain resulting in less effective pain treatment with worse outcomes. Participants will learn the evidence-based analysis of the relative effectiveness of medications and their side effects, recommendations on how to improve treatment of acute and chronic pain and recognizing substance use/opioid use disorders. Participants in this online educational activity must pass a posttest for successful completion. This course will focus on acute pain treatments/prescribing that can decrease the likelihood of long-term use.

As of July 1, 2017 all physicians (other than residents), physician assistants, nurse practitioners, podiatrists, and dentists who prescribe controlled substances must satisfy the controlled-substance prescribing CE requirement as set forth by their NC professional boards. Requirements vary by discipline and board. Prescribers will turn in controlled substance CE credits when they renew licensure.

Course Objectives:
1. Describe the impact of the opioid crisis
2. Identify the CDC guidelines for prescribing opioids for acute pain and the STOP Act
3. Discuss opioid alternatives and office policies for safe opioid prescribing

Jun
3
Mon
Treating Pain Safer: One Hour Online Course for Safe Opioid Prescribing – AVAILABLE NOW through March 15, 2021! @ Webinar
Jun 3 @ 12:00 am – 12:00 am

Treating Pain Safer: One Hour Online Course for Safe Opioid Prescribing

Description:
Literature has shown that prescribers receive little education on the treatment of pain resulting in less effective pain treatment with worse outcomes. Participants will learn the evidence-based analysis of the relative effectiveness of medications and their side effects, recommendations on how to improve treatment of acute and chronic pain and recognizing substance use/opioid use disorders. Participants in this online educational activity must pass a posttest for successful completion. This course will focus on acute pain treatments/prescribing that can decrease the likelihood of long-term use.

As of July 1, 2017 all physicians (other than residents), physician assistants, nurse practitioners, podiatrists, and dentists who prescribe controlled substances must satisfy the controlled-substance prescribing CE requirement as set forth by their NC professional boards. Requirements vary by discipline and board. Prescribers will turn in controlled substance CE credits when they renew licensure.

Course Objectives:
1. Describe the impact of the opioid crisis
2. Identify the CDC guidelines for prescribing opioids for acute pain and the STOP Act
3. Discuss opioid alternatives and office policies for safe opioid prescribing

Jun
27
Thu
Recovery Within Reach: Building Team Expertise in Office-Based Opioid Treatment (OBOT) @ MAHEC
Jun 27 @ 3:45 pm – 8:30 pm

Description

Opioid addiction is a chronic, relapsing brain disease that affects millions of Americans and produces a tremendous burden on the healthcare system. In 2002, U.S. physicians gained the opportunity to treat opioid-addicted patients with buprenorphine in primary care settings, commonly referred to as office-based opioid treatment (OBOT). OBOT has been shown to be effective in primary care settings and impacts public health through the reduction of opioid use, opioid overdose mortality and transmission of infectious diseases. However, it remains underutilized.

One consistently cited barrier preventing OBOT expansion is lack of adequate clinical support given the additional needs for patient monitoring. Successful medication-assisted treatment (MAT) requires a team-based approach just like treatment for other chronic diseases. In addition, treatment is more effective when providers can use a trauma-informed and gender-responsive treatment plan.

The goal of this companion program to the AAAP Clinical Support System: Buprenorphine Office-Based Treatment for Opioid Use Disorders (The “Half and Half” Course) is to increase the comfort level and expertise of the healthcare team by outlining a team approach, trauma-informed interventions, gender-responsive care, and recommendations for implementation of buprenorphine OBOT.

Target Audience

Nurses, mental health professionals including substance abuse counselors, social workers, psychologists, marriage and family therapists, school counselors, practice managers, program administrators, medical assistants, care managers and coordinators and other professionals interested in this subject.

Objectives

  • Describe the presented framework of office-based opioid treatment (OBOT) including practice changes, medications used, psychosocial services and integration/coordination components
  • Utilize evidence-based interventions that are trauma-informed and gender-responsive to treat persons with substance use disorders
  • Define the roles of an effective practice team, including primary care and behavioral health clinicians, working together with patients and families, and using a systematic and cost-effective approach to provide patient-centered care for opioid and other substance use disorders
  • Increase medical and behavioral health professionals’ receptivity and capability to work collaboratively as they evaluate and manage opioid and other substance use disorders using SBIRT (screening, brief intervention and referral to treatment)
  • List key components of evidence-based and effective OBOT