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Dr. Stephen Wyatt Receives Prestigious Glaser Award

Dr. Stephen Wyatt Receives Prestigious Glaser Award

RALEIGH, NC (April 2, 2019) – Stephen Wyatt, DO, medical director of Addiction Medicine at Atrium Health in Charlotte, was awarded the Frederick B. Glaser Award on March 23 at the Addiction Medicine 2019 conference held in Asheville, NC. The biennial award, given by...

10 Things to Know About Fentanyl

10 Things to Know About Fentanyl

In 2016, the powerful drug fentanyl claimed the life of music legend Prince and has, in recent years, largely contributed to the next wave of America’s opioid crisis. Here are 10 things you should know about fentanyl. 10 Things to Know About Fentanyl Learn more about...

Jan
26
Sat
Managing Pain in the Age of the Opioid Crisis (Free Breakfast) @ Gaston County DHHS
Jan 26 @ 7:30 am – 12:30 pm

Description

This inter-professional event will provide timely and relevant continuing education for medical prescribers and behavioral health professionals in the midst of the opioid crisis. Topics include evidence-based analysis of the relative effectiveness of medications and their side effects, treatment recommendations for acute and chronic pain, and recognizing substance use/opioid use disorder (SUD & OUD), as well as statistics and nuanced data on prescribing and substance abuse patterns in Gaston County. The North Carolina Medical Board will provide important updates in state laws and explore legal and ethical dilemmas associated with prescribing opioids in North Carolina. This educational activity satisfies the controlled substance prescribing Continuing Education content per NCAC rules and includes:

• Controlled substances prescribing practices
• Recognizing signs of the abuse or misuse of controlled substances
• Controlled substance prescribing for chronic pain management

As of July 1, 2017 all physicians (other than residents), physician assistants, nurse practitioners, podiatrists, and dentists who prescribe controlled substances must satisfy the controlled-substance prescribing Continuing Education requirements as set forth by their licensing boards. Requirements vary by discipline and board.

Jan
29
Tue
Recovery Within Reach: Building Team Expertise in Office-Based Opioid Treatment (OBOT) @ South East AHEC
Jan 29 @ 3:45 pm – 8:30 pm

Description

Opioid addiction is a chronic, relapsing brain disease that affects millions of Americans and produces a tremendous burden on the healthcare system. In 2002, U.S. physicians gained the opportunity to treat opioid-addicted patients with buprenorphine in primary care settings, commonly referred to as office-based opioid treatment (OBOT). OBOT has been shown to be effective in primary care settings and impacts public health through the reduction of opioid use, opioid overdose mortality and transmission of infectious diseases. However, it remains underutilized.One consistently cited barrier preventing OBOT expansion is lack of adequate clinical support given the additional needs for patient monitoring. Successful medication-assisted treatment (MAT) requires a team-based approach just like treatment for other chronic diseases. In addition, treatment is more effective when providers can use a trauma-informed and gender-responsive treatment plan.

The goal of this companion program to the AAAP Clinical Support System: Buprenorphine Office-Based Treatment for Opioid Use Disorders (The “Half and Half” Course) is to increase the comfort level and expertise of the healthcare team by outlining a team approach, trauma-informed interventions, gender-responsive care, and recommendations for implementation of buprenorphine OBOT.

Please note: This event will be held at South East AHEC, 2511 Delaney Ave., Wilmington, NC 28403.

By registering for this program, you are granting permission for your contact information to be shared with the North Carolina Medical Society Foundation, which is a collaborating partner of this continuing education activity.

Audience

Recommended for mental health professionals (including substance abuse counselors, social workers, psychologists, school counselors, and marriage and family therapists), practice managers, program administrators, nurses, medical assistants, care managers, care coordinators and other professionals interested in this subject.

HAVE A QUESTION?
Contact the Program Manager
Karen Lambert
karen.lambert@mahec.net or 828-257-4761

Providers’ Clinical Support System – Buprenorphine Office Based Treatment for Opioid Use Disorders The “Half and Half” Course @ South East AHEC
Jan 29 @ 4:00 pm – 8:45 pm

Description

Opioid dependence is epidemic in the United States. While progress has been made in training providers, the gap in providing effective treatment of opioid use disorders continues to widen—moving beyond heroin addicted individuals to a much larger and diverse segment of the population. This increase is predominantly due to an alarming increase in addiction to prescription opioid analgesic medications. Buprenorphine, the most recent addition to the pharmacotherapies available to treat opioid dependence, is novel among the opioid pharmacotherapies because of its partial agonist properties. It has been placed on Schedule III and is available by prescription from a physician’s office-based practice.

Recognizing the impact of this addiction, as well as learning how to treat opioid use disorders, are important steps in combating this ever growing medical problem. To obtain the waiver to prescribe, providers are required to take specialized training. PCSS-MAT uses the Half-and-Half format (first, 4.25 hours of face-to-face training with an instructor, followed by 3.75 hours of on-your-own-training that must be completed along with a post test). This meets the training requirements for physicians; however, additional training is required for advanced practice providers. The training focuses on the specifics of treating patients with opioid use disorders in office-based settings and clinical vignettes to help trainees think through “real life” experiences in opioid use disorders treatment. Once the waiver training is completed in full, participants will receive a CME certificate of attendance from AAAP.

January 29, 2019, at SEAHEC, 2511 Delaney Ave., Seagull Classroom, Wilmington, NC 28403 Click here to register

HAVE A QUESTION?

Contact the Program Manager
Karen Lambert
karen.lambert@mahec.net or 828-257-4761

This course will also be offered at other locations:

February 5, 2019, at Greensboro AHEC, Moses H. Cone Memorial Hospital, 1121 North Church St., Classroom GW185 (formerly Classroom 29), Greensboro, NC 27401 Click here to register

By registering for this program, you are granting permission for your contact information to be shared with the North Carolina Medical Society Foundation, which is a collaborating partner of this continuing education activity.

Target Audience

The program is recommended for prescribers in primary care, emergency medicine, pain management, psychiatric, HIV, and addiction medicine.(Not a prescriber? CLICK HERE)

Objectives

  • Review addiction treatment in office-based practices
  • Discuss the pharmacological treatments of opioid use disorder
  • Determine what medical record documentation must be followed
  • Discuss the process of buprenorphine induction as well as stabilization and maintenance techniques
  • Describe how to take a patient history and evaluation
  • Review safety concerns and drug interactions
Feb
1
Fri
Treating Pain Safer: One Hour Online Course for Safe Opioid Prescribing – AVAILABLE NOW through March 15, 2021! @ Webinar
Feb 1 @ 12:00 am – 12:00 am

Treating Pain Safer: One Hour Online Course for Safe Opioid Prescribing

Description:
Literature has shown that prescribers receive little education on the treatment of pain resulting in less effective pain treatment with worse outcomes. Participants will learn the evidence-based analysis of the relative effectiveness of medications and their side effects, recommendations on how to improve treatment of acute and chronic pain and recognizing substance use/opioid use disorders. Participants in this online educational activity must pass a posttest for successful completion. This course will focus on acute pain treatments/prescribing that can decrease the likelihood of long-term use.

As of July 1, 2017 all physicians (other than residents), physician assistants, nurse practitioners, podiatrists, and dentists who prescribe controlled substances must satisfy the controlled-substance prescribing CE requirement as set forth by their NC professional boards. Requirements vary by discipline and board. Prescribers will turn in controlled substance CE credits when they renew licensure.

Course Objectives:
1. Describe the impact of the opioid crisis
2. Identify the CDC guidelines for prescribing opioids for acute pain and the STOP Act
3. Discuss opioid alternatives and office policies for safe opioid prescribing

Feb
4
Mon
Certified Peer Support Specialist Training (40+ hour training) @ Southern Regional AHEC
Feb 4 – Feb 8 all-day

Description

Certified Peer Support Specialist Training includes the specific Peer Academy training, and 20 hours of Continuing Professional Development training: The twenty hours of training consists of Mental Health First Aid, The Challenge of Opioids, and Using Harm Reduction in the Treatment of Substance Use Disorders. Participants are able to apply for certification upon completion.
Peer Academy is the culmination of years of experience from international peer experts who, in addition to serving as peer specialists, have started up, developed, and currently operate successful peer organizations and programs. The developers and facilitators of Peer Academy are skilled and are committed to sharing their expertise in building a competent, qualified peer workforce as an investment in developing future leaders in the peer movement. Peer Academy is NOT an entry level training about personal recovery and peer support. Rather, it is an intense and rigorous professional development course that includes pre-academy coursework, homework, class exercises, and sharing your recovery story in class. PLEASE NOTE: Acceptance into Peer Academy is competitive, therefore we use an application and interview process to select participants. Those who are well-grounded in their own recovery and are committed to excelling as a peer specialist should apply. Once registered, we will contact you regarding next steps.

Note: participants must attend all sessions and topics.

Objectives

  • Peer Academy: Participants are able to describe the history of the peer movement and how that foundation led to the contemporary peer support role.
  • Peer Academy: Participants are able to discuss experiential practice to build skills and apply tools necessary for effective peer support.
  • Peer Academy: Participants are able to identify and describe comprehensive experiences for peer support specialists.
  • Peer Academy: Participants are able to describe needed actions to apply for certification after the completion of this 60 hour coursework.
  • Peer Academy: Participants are able to describe the difference between peer support and other professional roles within the behavioral health system, maintaining the principle and integrity of the peer role.
  • Peer Academy: Participants are able to describe the difference between peer support and other professional roles within the behavioral health system, maintaining the principle and integrity of the peer role.
  • Adult Mental Health First Aid: Participants are able to describe the prevalence of various mental health disorders in the U.S. and the need for reduced stigma in their communities.
  • Adult Mental Health First Aid: Participants are able to identify a 5-step action plan encompassing the skills, resources and knowledge to assess the situation, to select and implement appropriate interventions, and to help the individual in crisis connect with appropriate professional care.
  • Adult Mental Health First Aid: Participants are able to discuss the evidence-based professional, peer, social, and self-help resources available to help someone with a mental health problem
  • Challenge of Opioid Addiction: Participants are able to describe the effects of opioid use on patients, their support groups, and their communities.
  • Challenge of Opioid Addiction: Participants are able to identify therapeutic interventions, theories, and best practices.
  • Challenge of Opioid Addiction: Participants are able to identify three factors associated with determining a substance use disorder.
  • Challenge of Opioid Addiction: Participants are able to discuss three approaches used in the treatment of opioid use and induced disorders.
  • Harm Reduction: Participants are able to identify a rationale for the use of harm reduction techniques in the treatment of addictive diseases.
  • Harm Reduction: Participants are able to discuss harm reduction strategies that can be combined with evidence-based practices.
  • Harm Reduction: Participants are able to identify at least one strategy that may be used in developing a treatment plan using harm reduction.

Audience

The target audience has been planned to support an array of community, legal, health and human services organizations to include hospitals, emergency rooms, substance use disorder treatment centers, faith-based organizations, emergency medical services, departments of social services, law enforcement, judicial systems, primary care settings, emergency shelters, non-profits and other interested persons.

Available Credits

CEU 0.80
Contact Hours 8.00
NAADAC 8.00

Event Fees

For registration and payment received on or before November 19, 2018.

$256.00

Feb
5
Tue
Recovery Within Reach: Building Team Expertise in Office-Based Opioid Treatment (OBOT) – Greensboro AHEC @ Greensboro AHEC Moses H. Cone Memorial Hospital
Feb 5 @ 3:45 pm – 8:30 pm

Description

Opioid addiction is a chronic, relapsing brain disease that affects millions of Americans and produces a tremendous burden on the healthcare system. In 2002, U.S. physicians gained the opportunity to treat opioid-addicted patients with buprenorphine in primary care settings, commonly referred to as office-based opioid treatment (OBOT). OBOT has been shown to be effective in primary care settings and impacts public health through the reduction of opioid use, opioid overdose mortality and transmission of infectious diseases. However, it remains underutilized.

One consistently cited barrier preventing OBOT expansion is lack of adequate clinical support given the additional needs for patient monitoring. Successful medication-assisted treatment (MAT) requires a team-based approach just like treatment for other chronic diseases. In addition, treatment is more effective when providers can use a trauma-informed and gender-responsive treatment plan.

The goal of this companion program to the AAAP Clinical Support System: Buprenorphine Office-Based Treatment for Opioid Use Disorders (The “Half and Half” Course) is to increase the comfort level and expertise of the healthcare team by outlining a team approach, trauma-informed interventions, gender-responsive care, and recommendations for implementation of buprenorphine OBOT.

Target Audience

Recommended for mental health professionals (including substance abuse counselors, social workers, psychologists, school counselors, and marriage and family therapists), practice managers, program administrators, nurses, medical assistants, care managers, care coordinators and other professionals interested in this subject (Are you a prescriber? CLICK HERE)

Objectives

  • Describe the presented framework of office-based opioid treatment (OBOT) including practice changes, medications used, psychosocial services and integration/coordination components
  • Utilize evidence-based interventions that are trauma-informed and gender-responsive to treat persons with substance use disorders
  • Define the roles of an effective practice team, including primary care and behavioral health clinicians, working together with patients and families, and using a systematic and cost-effective approach to provide patient-centered care for opioid and other substance use disorders
  • Increase medical and behavioral health professionals’ receptivity and capability to work collaboratively as they evaluate and manage opioid and other substance use disorders using SBIRT (screening, brief intervention and referral to treatment)
  • List key components of evidence-based and effective OBOT

HAVE A QUESTION?

Contact the Program Manager
Karen Lambert
karen.lambert@mahec.net or 828-257-4761

By registering for this program, you are granting permission for your contact information to be shared with the North Carolina Medical Society Foundation, which is a collaborating partner of this continuing education activity.

Providers’ Clinical Support System – Buprenorphine Office Based Treatment for Opioid Use Disorders The “Half and Half” Course @ Greensboro AHEC Moses H. Cone Memorial Hospital
Feb 5 @ 4:00 pm – 8:45 pm

Description

Opioid dependence is epidemic in the United States. While progress has been made in training providers, the gap in providing effective treatment of opioid use disorders continues to widen—moving beyond heroin addicted individuals to a much larger and diverse segment of the population. This increase is predominantly due to an alarming increase in addiction to prescription opioid analgesic medications. Buprenorphine, the most recent addition to the pharmacotherapies available to treat opioid dependence, is novel among the opioid pharmacotherapies because of its partial agonist properties. It has been placed on Schedule III and is available by prescription from a physician’s office-based practice.

Recognizing the impact of this addiction, as well as learning how to treat opioid use disorders, are important steps in combating this ever growing medical problem. To obtain the waiver to prescribe, providers are required to take specialized training. PCSS-MAT uses the Half-and-Half format (first, 4.25 hours of face-to-face training with an instructor, followed by 3.75 hours of on-your-own-training that must be completed along with a post test). This meets the training requirements for physicians; however, additional training is required for advanced practice providers. The training focuses on the specifics of treating patients with opioid use disorders in office-based settings and clinical vignettes to help trainees think through “real life” experiences in opioid use disorders treatment. Once the waiver training is completed in full, participants will receive a CME certificate of attendance from AAAP.

February 5, 2019, at Greensboro AHEC, Moses H. Cone Memorial Hospital, 1121 North Church St., Classroom GW185 (formerly Classroom 29), Greensboro, NC 27401 Click here to register

HAVE A QUESTION?

Contact the Program Manager
Karen Lambert
karen.lambert@mahec.net or 828-257-4761

By registering for this program, you are granting permission for your contact information to be shared with the North Carolina Medical Society Foundation, which is a collaborating partner of this continuing education activity.

Target Audience

The program is recommended for prescribers in primary care, emergency medicine, pain management, psychiatric, HIV, and addiction medicine. Not a prescriber? CLICK HERE

Objectives

  • Review addiction treatment in office-based practices
  • Discuss the pharmacological treatments of opioid use disorder
  • Determine what medical record documentation must be followed
  • Discuss the process of buprenorphine induction as well as stabilization and maintenance techniques
  • Describe how to take a patient history and evaluation
  • Review safety concerns and drug interactions
Feb
8
Fri
Post-Overdose Response Team Regional Training in Kenansville, NC @ James Sprunt Community College (Duplin County)
Feb 8 all-day
Communities across the state are coming together to create an effective response to the significant increase in overdose deaths in recent years. Post-overdose response teams (PORTs) are an emerging strategy to meaningfully engage with people who have experienced overdose. These teams follow up with patients who have experienced an overdose within 72 hours. Teams seek to link the patient with appropriate care ranging from harm reduction services to treatment to recovery supports.
The NC Office of Emergency Medical Services in partnership with the NC Division of Public Health are hosting several regional trainings for post-overdose response team (PORT) development across the state. These PORT Trainings will equip participants to start or continue development of programs in partnership with first responders and harm reductionists. In addition to EMS-based partnerships, teams will learn to meaningfully engage with persons with lived experience or in recovery and other harm reduction specialists when developing and operating PORTs.
All first responders and public safety professionals are highly encouraged to attend the training. However, these trainings are open to anyone who is interested in developing a post-overdose response team in their community.
Program Objectives
  • Take a critical look at our understanding of substance use disorders, addiction science, and people who use drugs (PWUD).
  • Gain an understanding of more appropriate interventions, treatment, and linkage to care options for PWUD.
  • Examine what prevents people from seeking treatment.
  • Provide first responders and community partners with strategies aimed to identify resources in their community to support their team and how to make referrals to these agencies.
  • Equip you to develop a post-overdose response team to serve as a strategic approach to address overdose within your community.
Approximately 8 regional trainings for PORT development will be conducted across the state starting on the eastern side and through the western side over January to July 2019. The training will be one full business day (8a-5p). We are unable to provide travel support for attendance. Each training will cover the same information, so if you don’t see a training site in your area listed yet, please stay tuned for information on the upcoming trainings.
Feb
12
Tue
Project CARA Webinar Series: Building a Culture of Ethical Perinatal Substance Use Care (3-Part Webinar Series) @ Online Course
Feb 12 @ 7:00 am – 8:00 am

Description

In the past 15 years, the national prevalence of opioid use disorder in pregnant women jumped 333%, from 1.5 cases per 1,000 delivery hospitalizations to 6.5 per 1,000.9. Despite the clear need for appropriate substance use treatment, rural women in particular face barriers to receiving adequate substance use care including transportation, access, and stigma. Given the pervasiveness and alarming increase of this disease, perinatal substance use demands creative, gender specific care models to appropriately treat women inflicted with substance use disorders.

Since its inception in 2014, Project CARA (Care that Advocates Respect, Resilience, and Recovery for All) has housed its hub site at MAHEC OB in Asheville, and has evolved to meet the needs of clients, providers, and the service delivery system across Western North Carolina (WNC). Project CARA’s foundation has been built on evidence based perinatal substance use care while also nurturing partnerships with local and regional agencies to best serve these women and their families. In this 3 part webinar series, participants will develop a specialty in the treatment of substance use disorders during the perinatal period.

Agencies completing all course work are eligible to receive a Project CARA certificate and be recognized as a perinatal substance use disorder service provider that is dedicated to maintaining education and training of staff on person centered, trauma-informed care.

Want to know more about Project CARA? Click HERE for more information!

Sessions in Series (3 one-hour webinars)

Tuesdays: February 12 | February 19 | February 26
Not sold separately, two chances to attend each day: 7-8 AM or 12-1 PM
Registration closes 48 hours prior to each session

Session 1 – What if We Treated Everyone as if They Have a Trauma History?

Participants will review trauma informed care and improve practical skills to screen pregnant women with substance use disorders.

Objectives:
1. Review the prevalence of trauma in the pregnant and parenting population affected by substance use disorders
2. Examine the ethics of delivering a trauma based approach in pregnancy care
3. Evaluate unconscious bias, language, and stigma affecting access and delivery of substance use care during pregnancy
4. Evaluate their physical space and its role in trauma-informed care

Session 2 – Medication Assisted Treatment (MAT) and Pregnant Women: Expertise in Evaluating the Client in Active Disease

Participants will develop expertise in evaluating the client in active disease.

Objectives:
1. Review current evidenced based recommendations for MAT in substance use disorders during pregnancy
2. Review common behaviors seen in active addiction and how to manage the disease state vs. the client
3. Integrate patient-centered decision making and evidence based recommendations for MAT
4. Formulate how to build a community that is receptive to and accepting of MAT in order to address social determinants of health

Session 3 – The Team Approach: Changing Generational Patterns of Substance Use Disorders One Pregnancy at a Time

Participants will learn collaborative team approach methods that affect the incidence of inter-generational substance use disorder.

Objectives:
1. Review the basics of attachment theory and early infant bonding
2. Review Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs) and their role in substance use disorders
3. Evaluate current evidence surrounding support of the “Mother Baby Dyad”
4. Develop a plan for building resilient communities through a collaborative model

Group Registrations

Registering several participants with one payment? Please use the paper registration form at the end of the brochure (coming soon). Completed paper registrations can then be faxed, scanned and emailed, or mailed to the MAHEC Registration Team.

Feb
18
Mon
Treating Pain Safely: Fewer Opioids and Better Results Controlled Substances Education for Prescribers @ Swain County Hospital
Feb 18 @ 5:30 pm – 8:45 pm

Literature has shown that prescribers receive little education on the treatment of pain, resulting in less effective pain treatment with worse outcomes. Attendees will learn the evidence-based analysis of the relative effectiveness of medications and their side effects, recommendations on how to improve treatment of acute and chronic pain, and recognizing substance use/opioid use disorders. This program will include the three required topics outlined by the new CME requirement in 21 NCAC 32R .0101:

• Controlled substances prescribing practices
• Recognizing signs of the abuse or misuse of controlled substances
• Controlled substance prescribing for chronic pain management

As of July 1, 2017 all physicians (other than residents), physician assistants, nurse practitioners, podiatrists, and dentists who prescribe controlled substances must satisfy the controlled-substance prescribing CE requirements as set forth by their licensing boards; requirements vary by discipline and board. Physicians must follow the CME requirement per 21 NCAC 32R .0101 and will turn in record of controlled substance CME when they renew licensure.

Objectives

  • Describe the impact of the opioid crisis
  • Identify the CDC guidelines for prescribing opioids for acute pain
  • Identify the CDC guidelines for prescribing opioids for chronic pain
  • Discuss what to do with patients on opioids that fall outside the guidelines
Feb
20
Wed
Adopting Best Practices in Substance Abuse Treatment: An Ongoing Teaching Case Conference Series @ William F Andrews Center
Feb 20 @ 10:30 am – 12:00 pm

Program Description: In this time of major systems change, addiction treatment professionals are challenged to treat increasingly complex alcohol and other drug use disorders with a greater emphasis on evidence-based outcomes and cost effectiveness. At the same time there have been significant advances in our understanding of the biological and environmental underpinnings of addictive disease which has informed emerging treatment best practices. While a number of evidence based behavioral and medication assisted practices have been developed to respond to the science, the gap between research and practice has been highlighted by the Institute of Medicine (1998). In an effort to bridge this gap, there is a growing effort within the field of addictions treatment to better integrate research with practice by implementing science based practices. These specific practices are described in NIDA’s Priniciples of Drug Addiction Treatment : A Research Based Guide (2008) as well as in the findings from the Conference on Approaches For Combating the Troublesome Use of Substances (CACTUS) as published in Rethinking Substance Abuse by William R. Miller and Kathleen M. Carroll (2008). This series is also focused on introducing participants to evidence based treatment models included in the current National Registry of Evidence Based Programs Practices (SAMHSA). These EBPs include Motivational Interviewing, Motivational Incentives, Seeking Safety, Cognitive Based Therapies and Mindfulness based interventions. Discussions will focus on ways that practitioners can apply these practices and evidence based models to current clinical situations.

Method: This teaching case conference series uses a traditional case study and facilitated learning collaborative method to assist participants to identify, learn and apply best practices and evidence based models within the context of actual cases. Participants will be expected to come prepared each session with cases that present special challenges as well as opportunities for learning. The goal of these conferences will be to identify appropriate best practices and to find ways in which specific evidence based treatments can be used to incorporate the use of evidence based treatments.

This teaching case conference series is also intended to promote collaboration among treatment providers in an effort to facilitate cross referrals, promote a regional recovery oriented system of care and integrated care approaches. The series will also serve as a vehicle for disseminating information about new research findings as well as available professional development and community service resources. Finally, these sessions will be facilitated in a manner to promote collegial support and enhance workforce morale and retention.

See brochure for speaker information.

Objectives

  • Present cases that provide an opportunity for shared learning.
  • Learn and discuss best practices and evidence based treatments that can be applied in the real world.
  • Identify opportunities for further training in evidence based practices.
  • Facilitate referrals and system of care development.
  • Review and discuss research based findings and perspectives.
  • Improve workforce morale and retention.
Feb
22
Fri
Advanced Opioid Workshop: Transforming Practice To Save Lives “Elevating the Role of the Pharmacist” @ Novant Medical Center
Feb 22 all-day

Four dynamic modules of content will be covered:
1) Pain Management Topics and Best Practices
2) Harm Reduction Topics and Service Concepts
3) Use of SBIRT (Screening, Brief Intervention and Referral to Treatment) in practice
4) Fundamentals of Medication Assisted Treatment

♦ 8 hours of LIVE Continuing Education
♦ Interactive & practical sessions designed to help pharmacists
implement new services and practices
♦ Toolkit of helpful resources and information
♦ Steps for integrating new services into existing workflow
♦ Access to an online networking community for attendees to
ask questions, share ideas, and experiences once the workshop is over

Building Capacity to Manage Mental Health and the Opioid Crisis in the Foothills @ J. E. Broyhill Civic Center
Feb 22 @ 8:30 am – 4:30 pm

Description

Full Day and Afternoon-only Sessions Available!

Morning Session- Getting Primary Care into the Battle
The US is facing a crisis in both mental health and opioid abuse. Mental health care embedded within primary care, medical homes can go a long way to providing a solution to this crisis. Medication-assisted treatment (MAT) combined with behavioral therapy can restore productive lives. Our expert speakers will discuss the practical ways to make this work in busy primary care offices.

Topics will include:
• Common mental health issues seen in primary care including substance abuse and chronic pain
• Integrating with mental health specialists and making this work financially
• Providing effective medication-assisted treatment in primary care settings
• Perceived barriers to providing mental health care in primary care settings

Afternoon Session: Mobilizing the Community to Overcome Barriers and Find Solutions
The opioid crisis is truly an epidemic of epic proportions. Inadequate mental health capacity adds to the challenge. The impact is felt daily by individuals, families, and communities. Join us to look at our realities and find solutions.

This will be a dynamic and interactive session using a facilitated small group/tabletop discussion format. The session will focus on three key dimensions of the opioid crisis – mental health factors that contribute to the crisis, patient/chronic care management, and local, team-based solutions.

Results will include:
• Finding common and unique challenges of mental health and opioid use from all constituents represented
• Addressing modifiers or facilitators from a systems perspective that impact the issues
• Identifying next day changes that each participant can make in their own communities or organizations

Target Audience

Physicians, Advanced Practice Providers, Pharmacists, Nurses, Emergency Medicine, First Responders, Paramedics, Counselors, Social Workers, Psychologists, Teachers and Legislators

Objectives

Upon completion of this knowledge-based educational activity, participants will be able to:

  • Describe the embedded integrated care clinical model using a behaviorist embedded in a primary care team and roles and responsibilities of the team members
  • Examine the steps to operationalize the integrated care model, including planning, staffing, workflow, facilities, care coordination and information technology
  • Review the development of substance use problems and the neurobiology of addiction
  • Recognize how to appropriately evaluate and use opioids to treat chronic pain into busy primary care settings, including how to integrate Medication Assisted Treatment (MAT) (ex: buprenorphine) strategies
  • Engage in discussion and develop actions to breakdown barriers that society and healthcare providers have in treating addiction and substance misuse
  • Describe the efforts by NC DHHS to combat the opioid and mental health challenges in NC, including the NC Opioid Task Force and Medicaid transformation/tailored plans

Faculty

  • Ed J. Bujold, MD, FAAFP
  • Hazel Tapp, PhD
  • Stephen Wyatt, DO
  • Joel Hornberger, MHS
  • Kim Kimminau, PhD

Sessions

Full Day Attendance OR Afternoon Only

FULL DAY: Getting Primary Care into the Battle (Morning) & Mobilizing Community Resources (Afternoon)
2/22 8:30 AM–4:30 PM
ONLY AFTERNOON: Mobilizing Community Resources
2/22 12:30 PM–4:30 PM
Feb
26
Tue
Building Connections across Organizations: Working Together to Understand and Respond to the Opioid Epidemic in NC @ Gillings School of Global Public Health
Feb 26 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

The UNC Opioid Research Group presents:

Building Connections across Organizations: Working Together to Understand and Respond to the Opioid Epidemic in NC

 

Nidhi Sachdeva, MPH, Senior Research Program Leader

Department of Population Health Sciences at Duke University

 

February 26, 2019

12-1 pm

3005 Michael Hooker Research Center

Gillings School of Global Public Health

 

Lunch provided

Register by February 21

 

Need accommodations? Email Leah Taraskiewicz at leahkt@unc.edu

Mar
1
Fri
Treating Pain Safer: One Hour Online Course for Safe Opioid Prescribing – AVAILABLE NOW through March 15, 2021! @ Webinar
Mar 1 @ 12:00 am – 12:00 am

Treating Pain Safer: One Hour Online Course for Safe Opioid Prescribing

Description:
Literature has shown that prescribers receive little education on the treatment of pain resulting in less effective pain treatment with worse outcomes. Participants will learn the evidence-based analysis of the relative effectiveness of medications and their side effects, recommendations on how to improve treatment of acute and chronic pain and recognizing substance use/opioid use disorders. Participants in this online educational activity must pass a posttest for successful completion. This course will focus on acute pain treatments/prescribing that can decrease the likelihood of long-term use.

As of July 1, 2017 all physicians (other than residents), physician assistants, nurse practitioners, podiatrists, and dentists who prescribe controlled substances must satisfy the controlled-substance prescribing CE requirement as set forth by their NC professional boards. Requirements vary by discipline and board. Prescribers will turn in controlled substance CE credits when they renew licensure.

Course Objectives:
1. Describe the impact of the opioid crisis
2. Identify the CDC guidelines for prescribing opioids for acute pain and the STOP Act
3. Discuss opioid alternatives and office policies for safe opioid prescribing