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Dr. Stephen Wyatt Receives Prestigious Glaser Award

Dr. Stephen Wyatt Receives Prestigious Glaser Award

RALEIGH, NC (April 2, 2019) – Stephen Wyatt, DO, medical director of Addiction Medicine at Atrium Health in Charlotte, was awarded the Frederick B. Glaser Award on March 23 at the Addiction Medicine 2019 conference held in Asheville, NC. The biennial award, given by...

10 Things to Know About Fentanyl

10 Things to Know About Fentanyl

In 2016, the powerful drug fentanyl claimed the life of music legend Prince and has, in recent years, largely contributed to the next wave of America’s opioid crisis. Here are 10 things you should know about fentanyl. 10 Things to Know About Fentanyl Learn more about...

Oct
30
Tue
Challenges for Nurses in Assessing and Managing Pain @ Charlotte AHEC, Bldg K
Oct 30 @ 9:00 am – 4:15 pm

An event for RNs, LPNs, and other health care professionals who are caring for patient with pain.

Pain assessment is crucial if pain management is to be effective. Nurses are in a unique position to assess pain as they have the most contact with patients. This program will provide information related to pain (Acute, Persistent/Chronic, and Oncologic pain). It will also provide an overview of proper pain assessment, pharmacological treatments of non-opioids and opioids for pain and general principles of analgesic use for treating pain patients.

The speaker for this event is Sherry McCulley-Hall, MSN, RN-BC, Clinical Nurse Specialist
Sherry is a Clinical Nurse Specialist for the Veterans Integrative Pain Medicine Service at Charles George VA Medical Center. She has worked in the nursing field for over 36 years. Sherry received a Bachelor of Science in Nursing at Berea College and Masters of Science in Nursing with an area of study as an Adult Health Care Specialist at UNC Charlotte with a clinical concentration in Oncology Nursing. In 2012, Sherry worked collaboratively with 7 Pain Management Nurse Experts from the VA as well as the University of Wisconsin in the development of the Pain Resource Nurse Program targeting the Veteran Population. Sherry is credentialed by the ANCC as a Clinical Nurse Specialist and a Certified Nurse Pain Management provider.

Click here to be taken to registration. $99.00 – Pre-Registration Fee (before Oct. 16,2018). Breakfast and Lunch Provided.

 

Treating Pain Safely: Fewer Opioids and Better Results Controlled Substances Education for Prescribers @ MAHEC Mary C. Nesbitt Biltmore Campus, Pisgah Room
Oct 30 @ 5:30 pm – 8:45 pm

Literature has shown that prescribers receive little education on the treatment of pain, resulting in less effective pain treatment with worse outcomes. Attendees will learn the evidence-based analysis of the relative effectiveness of medications and their side effects, recommendations on how to improve treatment of acute and chronic pain, and recognizing substance use/opioid use disorders. This program will include the three required topics outlined by the new CME requirement in 21 NCAC 32R .0101:

• Controlled substances prescribing practices
• Recognizing signs of the abuse or misuse of controlled substances
• Controlled substance prescribing for chronic pain management

As of July 1, 2017 all physicians (other than residents), physician assistants, nurse practitioners, podiatrists, and dentists who prescribe controlled substances must satisfy the controlled-substance prescribing CE requirements as set forth by their licensing boards; requirements vary by discipline and board. Physicians must follow the CME requirement per 21 NCAC 32R .0101 and will turn in record of controlled substance CME when they renew licensure.

Objectives

  • Describe the impact of the opioid crisis
  • Identify the CDC guidelines for prescribing opioids for acute pain
  • Identify the CDC guidelines for prescribing opioids for chronic pain
  • Discuss what to do with patients on opioids that fall outside the guidelines
Evidence-Based Narcotic Prescribing- Elizabeth City @ Eastern AHEC Education Center
Oct 30 @ 6:00 pm – 8:30 pm

Prescription opioid pain medications are responsible for more deaths in North Carolina than heroin and cocaine combined. And, if current trends continue, unintentional poisoning deaths will surpass motor vehicle deaths as the leading cause of injury death in North Carolina. This presentation tackles the prescription drug challenges in practices outlining evidence-based narcotic prescribing and alternative therapy to chronic pain management.

Objectives
Upon completion of this knowledge-based program the participant should be able to
integrate into practice new developments in the following areas:
Tackling the Prescription Drug Problem in Your Practice: An Outline for
Evidence-Based Narcotic Prescribing
• Review the statistics for prescription drug use and overdose in the US
• Explain the psychological basis for drug seeking behaviors
• Provide an algorithm for appropriate safety based opiate prescribing
• Discuss some common opiate prescribing challenges in practice

Alternative Therapy for Chronic Pain Management
• Evaluate non-opiate pharmacologic agents for use in chronic pain
• Introduce clinical health psychology as viable treatment options
• Discuss effectiveness and indications for specialized interventions:
topical agents, physical medicine, mechanical interventions

Registration

Registration is only available online:
www.easternahec.net

Pre-registration is required to assure space in this program.
The fee for registrations received prior to October 18,
2018 is $20.00. For registrations received after October
18, 2018, the fee is $35.00. The registration fee includes
dinner

Click here for a program brochure

Nov
6
Tue
Providers’ Clinical Support System: Buprenorphine Office-Based Treatment for Opioid Use Disorders, The “Half and Half” Course @ Northwest AHEC
Nov 6 @ 4:00 pm – 9:00 pm

Opioid dependence is epidemic in the United States. While progress has been made in training providers, the gap in providing effective treatment of opioid use disorders continues to widen – moving beyond heroin addicted individuals to a much larger and diverse segment of the population. This increase in predominantly due to an alarming increase in addiction to prescription opioid analgesic medications.

Buprenorphine, the most recent addition to the pharmacotherapies available to treat opioid dependence, is novel among the opioid pharmacotherapies because of its partial agonist properties. It has been placed on Schedule III and is available by prescription from a physician’s office-based practice.

Recognizing the impact of this addiction, as well as learning how to treat opioid use disorders, are important steps in combating this ever growing medical problem. To obtain the waiver to prescribe, providers are required to take specialized training. PCSS-MAT uses the Half-and-Half format (first, 4.25 hours of face-to-face training with an instructor, followed by 3.75 hours of on-your-own training that must be completed along with a post test). This meets the training requirements for physicians; however, additional training is required for advanced practice providers.

The training focuses on the specifics of treating patients with opioid use disorders in office-based settings and clinical vignettes to help trainees think through “real life” experiences in opioid use disorders treatment. Once the waiver training is completed in full, participants will receive a CME certificate of attendance from AAAP.

Objectives:

  • Define the federal Drug Abuse Treatment Act (DATA) of 2000 and the subsequent revisions that list the criteria needed for Office Based Opioid Treatment (OBOT)
  • List the criteria for establishing a diagnosis of opioid dependence.
  • Distinguish between spontaneous withdrawal and precipitated withdrawal and the appropriate methods of buprenorphine induction.
  • Describe and contrast the functions of full mu agonists, partial agonists and antagonists.
  • Explain the interplay between pain and addiction and how buprenorphine can be used to help stabilize these patients.
  • Describe the basic approach used in at least three different types of non-pharmacological treatments of opioid dependence.
  • Describe three symptoms of opioid withdrawal or intoxication that mimic symptoms of a psychiatric disorder.
  • Describe at least three factors to consider in determining if the patient is an appropriate candidate for office-based treatment with buprenorphine.
  • Describe at least three areas that should be covered in the rules and expectations communicated to patients during the patient assessment process.
  • List at least three situations in which patient information, with patient identity, can be shared under current laws protecting the patient’s confidentiality 42 CFR and HIPAA
  • Reduce and minimize buprenorphine misuse and diversion.
  • Describe the drug interactions of buprenorphine and pediatric exposures.

Click here for a brochure

Nov
8
Thu
2018 Pain Conference: An Interprofessional Approach to Pain Management @ Mountain Area Health Education Center, Blue Ridge Room
Nov 8 @ 7:45 am – Nov 9 @ 12:15 pm

As the opioid epidemic rages on, better approaches to the understanding and management of pain are needed by healthcare providers “in the trenches”. This annual, interprofessional conference has been expanded from one day to one and 1/2 days to allow more in-depth exploration of the neuroscience of pain and non-opioid approaches to better manage pain.

This educational activity is jointly provided with the Charles George VA Medical Center and co-sponsored by the UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy.

Objectives

  • Explain pain neuroscience effectively to engage more active patient pain management participation
  • Integrate opioid alternatives into pain management routinely
  • Screen for opioid use disorder and strategize appropriate case management
  • Incorporate CBT, Whole Health Approaches and/or MBSR into pain management strategies

MAHEC Employees receive a registration discount

Nov
29
Thu
Behavioral Treatment of Chronic Pain: Evidence-Based Tools to Move from Hurt to Hope @ MAHEC
Nov 29 @ 9:00 am – 4:45 pm

Description

Across the nation, healthcare providers are taking another look at how to safely and effectively treat pain while also reducing the risks associated with opioids. It is estimated that 100 million people in the U.S. are living with chronic pain and that approximately 1/3 of these individuals are seeking medical treatment for their pain.

Pain management has typically not been a part of behavioral health practice but research and clinical practice are demonstrating that behavioral interventions are the most effective treatment for chronic pain. The CDC recently put out guidelines that highlight the opioid epidemic and its tragic consequences, along with recommendations for treating chronic pain. Behavioral treatment is the most effective treatment and should be tried prior to prescribing opioids.

More behavioral health providers with expertise in behavioral interventions for pain management are needed to combat the opioid epidemic. This interactive and cutting-edge training will provide participants with innovative and evidence-based tools and techniques to expand their clinical practice and treat chronic pain. Participants will gain the skills and confidence needed to provide practical and life-changing interventions to help individuals manage chronic pain and enjoy active, healthy and meaningful lives.

Can’t make this date? This program is also offered on March 8th, 2019- Click HERE for details and to register!

Download Event Brochure 

Target Audience

Behavioral health professionals including psychologists, social workers, counselors, marriage and family therapists, substance abuse counselors, and others interested in this topic.

Objectives

  • Define pain and its emotional aspects
  • Describe and map out the chronic pain cycle
  • List risks of opioid medications
  • Utilize effective components of the cognitive-behavioral treatment of chronic pain
  • Demonstrate mindful approaches for chronic pain
Jan
1
Tue
Treating Pain Safer: One Hour Online Course for Safe Opioid Prescribing – AVAILABLE NOW through March 15, 2021! @ Webinar
Jan 1 @ 12:00 am – 12:00 am

Treating Pain Safer: One Hour Online Course for Safe Opioid Prescribing

Description:
Literature has shown that prescribers receive little education on the treatment of pain resulting in less effective pain treatment with worse outcomes. Participants will learn the evidence-based analysis of the relative effectiveness of medications and their side effects, recommendations on how to improve treatment of acute and chronic pain and recognizing substance use/opioid use disorders. Participants in this online educational activity must pass a posttest for successful completion. This course will focus on acute pain treatments/prescribing that can decrease the likelihood of long-term use.

As of July 1, 2017 all physicians (other than residents), physician assistants, nurse practitioners, podiatrists, and dentists who prescribe controlled substances must satisfy the controlled-substance prescribing CE requirement as set forth by their NC professional boards. Requirements vary by discipline and board. Prescribers will turn in controlled substance CE credits when they renew licensure.

Course Objectives:
1. Describe the impact of the opioid crisis
2. Identify the CDC guidelines for prescribing opioids for acute pain and the STOP Act
3. Discuss opioid alternatives and office policies for safe opioid prescribing

Jan
26
Sat
Managing Pain in the Age of the Opioid Crisis (Free Breakfast) @ Gaston County DHHS
Jan 26 @ 7:30 am – 12:30 pm

Description

This inter-professional event will provide timely and relevant continuing education for medical prescribers and behavioral health professionals in the midst of the opioid crisis. Topics include evidence-based analysis of the relative effectiveness of medications and their side effects, treatment recommendations for acute and chronic pain, and recognizing substance use/opioid use disorder (SUD & OUD), as well as statistics and nuanced data on prescribing and substance abuse patterns in Gaston County. The North Carolina Medical Board will provide important updates in state laws and explore legal and ethical dilemmas associated with prescribing opioids in North Carolina. This educational activity satisfies the controlled substance prescribing Continuing Education content per NCAC rules and includes:

• Controlled substances prescribing practices
• Recognizing signs of the abuse or misuse of controlled substances
• Controlled substance prescribing for chronic pain management

As of July 1, 2017 all physicians (other than residents), physician assistants, nurse practitioners, podiatrists, and dentists who prescribe controlled substances must satisfy the controlled-substance prescribing Continuing Education requirements as set forth by their licensing boards. Requirements vary by discipline and board.

Feb
1
Fri
Treating Pain Safer: One Hour Online Course for Safe Opioid Prescribing – AVAILABLE NOW through March 15, 2021! @ Webinar
Feb 1 @ 12:00 am – 12:00 am

Treating Pain Safer: One Hour Online Course for Safe Opioid Prescribing

Description:
Literature has shown that prescribers receive little education on the treatment of pain resulting in less effective pain treatment with worse outcomes. Participants will learn the evidence-based analysis of the relative effectiveness of medications and their side effects, recommendations on how to improve treatment of acute and chronic pain and recognizing substance use/opioid use disorders. Participants in this online educational activity must pass a posttest for successful completion. This course will focus on acute pain treatments/prescribing that can decrease the likelihood of long-term use.

As of July 1, 2017 all physicians (other than residents), physician assistants, nurse practitioners, podiatrists, and dentists who prescribe controlled substances must satisfy the controlled-substance prescribing CE requirement as set forth by their NC professional boards. Requirements vary by discipline and board. Prescribers will turn in controlled substance CE credits when they renew licensure.

Course Objectives:
1. Describe the impact of the opioid crisis
2. Identify the CDC guidelines for prescribing opioids for acute pain and the STOP Act
3. Discuss opioid alternatives and office policies for safe opioid prescribing

Feb
18
Mon
Treating Pain Safely: Fewer Opioids and Better Results Controlled Substances Education for Prescribers @ Swain County Hospital
Feb 18 @ 5:30 pm – 8:45 pm

Literature has shown that prescribers receive little education on the treatment of pain, resulting in less effective pain treatment with worse outcomes. Attendees will learn the evidence-based analysis of the relative effectiveness of medications and their side effects, recommendations on how to improve treatment of acute and chronic pain, and recognizing substance use/opioid use disorders. This program will include the three required topics outlined by the new CME requirement in 21 NCAC 32R .0101:

• Controlled substances prescribing practices
• Recognizing signs of the abuse or misuse of controlled substances
• Controlled substance prescribing for chronic pain management

As of July 1, 2017 all physicians (other than residents), physician assistants, nurse practitioners, podiatrists, and dentists who prescribe controlled substances must satisfy the controlled-substance prescribing CE requirements as set forth by their licensing boards; requirements vary by discipline and board. Physicians must follow the CME requirement per 21 NCAC 32R .0101 and will turn in record of controlled substance CME when they renew licensure.

Objectives

  • Describe the impact of the opioid crisis
  • Identify the CDC guidelines for prescribing opioids for acute pain
  • Identify the CDC guidelines for prescribing opioids for chronic pain
  • Discuss what to do with patients on opioids that fall outside the guidelines
Mar
1
Fri
Treating Pain Safer: One Hour Online Course for Safe Opioid Prescribing – AVAILABLE NOW through March 15, 2021! @ Webinar
Mar 1 @ 12:00 am – 12:00 am

Treating Pain Safer: One Hour Online Course for Safe Opioid Prescribing

Description:
Literature has shown that prescribers receive little education on the treatment of pain resulting in less effective pain treatment with worse outcomes. Participants will learn the evidence-based analysis of the relative effectiveness of medications and their side effects, recommendations on how to improve treatment of acute and chronic pain and recognizing substance use/opioid use disorders. Participants in this online educational activity must pass a posttest for successful completion. This course will focus on acute pain treatments/prescribing that can decrease the likelihood of long-term use.

As of July 1, 2017 all physicians (other than residents), physician assistants, nurse practitioners, podiatrists, and dentists who prescribe controlled substances must satisfy the controlled-substance prescribing CE requirement as set forth by their NC professional boards. Requirements vary by discipline and board. Prescribers will turn in controlled substance CE credits when they renew licensure.

Course Objectives:
1. Describe the impact of the opioid crisis
2. Identify the CDC guidelines for prescribing opioids for acute pain and the STOP Act
3. Discuss opioid alternatives and office policies for safe opioid prescribing

Mar
8
Fri
Behavioral Treatment of Chronic Pain: Evidence-Based Tools to Move from Hurt to Hope @ MAHEC
Mar 8 @ 9:00 am – 4:45 pm

Description

Across the nation, healthcare providers are taking another look at how to safely and effectively treat pain while also reducing the risks associated with opioids. It is estimated that 100 million people in the U.S. are living with chronic pain and that approximately 1/3 of these individuals are seeking medical treatment for their pain.

Pain management has typically not been a part of behavioral health practice but research and clinical practice are demonstrating that behavioral interventions are the most effective treatment for chronic pain. The CDC recently put out guidelines that highlight the opioid epidemic and its tragic consequences, along with recommendations for treating chronic pain. Behavioral treatment is the most effective treatment and should be tried prior to prescribing opioids.

More behavioral health providers with expertise in behavioral interventions for pain management are needed to combat the opioid epidemic. This interactive and cutting-edge training will provide participants with innovative and evidence-based tools and techniques to expand their clinical practice and treat chronic pain. Participants will gain the skills and confidence needed to provide practical and life-changing interventions to help individuals manage chronic pain and enjoy active, healthy and meaningful lives.

Can’t make this date? This program is also offered on March 8th, 2019- Click HERE for details and to register!

Download Event Brochure 

Target Audience

Behavioral health professionals including psychologists, social workers, counselors, marriage and family therapists, substance abuse counselors, and others interested in this topic.

Objectives

  • Define pain and its emotional aspects
  • Describe and map out the chronic pain cycle
  • List risks of opioid medications
  • Utilize effective components of the cognitive-behavioral treatment of chronic pain
  • Demonstrate mindful approaches for chronic pain
Mar
21
Thu
Addiction Medicine Conference in Asheville, NC @ Renaissance Asheville Hotel
Mar 21 – Mar 23 all-day
Apr
1
Mon
Treating Pain Safer: One Hour Online Course for Safe Opioid Prescribing – AVAILABLE NOW through March 15, 2021! @ Webinar
Apr 1 @ 12:00 am – 12:00 am

Treating Pain Safer: One Hour Online Course for Safe Opioid Prescribing

Description:
Literature has shown that prescribers receive little education on the treatment of pain resulting in less effective pain treatment with worse outcomes. Participants will learn the evidence-based analysis of the relative effectiveness of medications and their side effects, recommendations on how to improve treatment of acute and chronic pain and recognizing substance use/opioid use disorders. Participants in this online educational activity must pass a posttest for successful completion. This course will focus on acute pain treatments/prescribing that can decrease the likelihood of long-term use.

As of July 1, 2017 all physicians (other than residents), physician assistants, nurse practitioners, podiatrists, and dentists who prescribe controlled substances must satisfy the controlled-substance prescribing CE requirement as set forth by their NC professional boards. Requirements vary by discipline and board. Prescribers will turn in controlled substance CE credits when they renew licensure.

Course Objectives:
1. Describe the impact of the opioid crisis
2. Identify the CDC guidelines for prescribing opioids for acute pain and the STOP Act
3. Discuss opioid alternatives and office policies for safe opioid prescribing

Apr
4
Thu
Treating Pain Safely: Fewer Opioids and Better Results Controlled Substances Education for Prescribers @ MAHEC Mary C. Nesbitt Biltmore Campus, Pisgah Room
Apr 4 @ 5:30 pm – 8:45 pm

Literature has shown that prescribers receive little education on the treatment of pain, resulting in less effective pain treatment with worse outcomes. Attendees will learn the evidence-based analysis of the relative effectiveness of medications and their side effects, recommendations on how to improve treatment of acute and chronic pain, and recognizing substance use/opioid use disorders. This program will include the three required topics outlined by the new CME requirement in 21 NCAC 32R .0101:

• Controlled substances prescribing practices
• Recognizing signs of the abuse or misuse of controlled substances
• Controlled substance prescribing for chronic pain management

As of July 1, 2017 all physicians (other than residents), physician assistants, nurse practitioners, podiatrists, and dentists who prescribe controlled substances must satisfy the controlled-substance prescribing CE requirements as set forth by their licensing boards; requirements vary by discipline and board. Physicians must follow the CME requirement per 21 NCAC 32R .0101 and will turn in record of controlled substance CME when they renew licensure.

Objectives

  • Describe the impact of the opioid crisis
  • Identify the CDC guidelines for prescribing opioids for acute pain
  • Identify the CDC guidelines for prescribing opioids for chronic pain
  • Discuss what to do with patients on opioids that fall outside the guidelines